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more on DHT and skull expansion. INTERESTING read

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by opeth88 » April 6, 2009 at 11:25 am #117039

The link has a link to a skull expansion e-book. Now, This is pretty “new age” I suppose, but I think all possibilities need to be considered. I’ll post a few lines in the e-book, so if you’re interested, you can check it out.

There are a few interesting pictures of the skull and how it expands. Something to look into.

“Androgens, like DHT, can be linked to both hair loss and hair growth. DHT causes facial, body and pubic hair to grow in men during puberty, but it also has a direct connection with AGA.
How can this be?
DHT is a steroid hormone which means that, whilst it stimulates new hair growth, it also has an anabolic effect on bone formation 7. In other words, it makes bone grow! And it’s through this continued bone growth (skull expansion) that overwhelms the hair growth promoting effects of DHT.
This provides the answer to question 3 in chapter 1.
For men at puberty, steroid hormones are responsible for the rapid increase in bone growth (and muscle development) they experience. This also explains the connection that exists between bodybuilding and AGA – bodybuilders often suffer hair loss because intense weight training will increase testosterone and DHT levels (as do anabolic steroids).”

2.4.1 Sebum
Sebum is a waxy, oily substance secreted by the sebaceous glands within hair follicles. Its production is governed by androgens (including DHT) so it’s easy to see the connection between DHT and sebum. As well as stimulating the skull expansion process, DHT can also contribute to hair loss locally (i.e., within hair follicles) through excessive sebum production. However, this is very much secondary to the skull expansion process.

It’s long been known that a genetic link to AGA exists.
Most research currently places focus on the 5-alpha reductase and androgen receptor genes. However, it’s the genes that determine skull shape and size that are responsible for AGA.
2.5.1 Sexual dimorphism
Sexual dimorphism 9 means that the form (shape, size, etc) can vary between the two sexes. For example, women usually have wider hips, whilst men are generally taller and heavier (due to bigger bones and greater muscle development).
Skull expansion is a largely sexually dimorphic characteristic, affecting men much more so than women. Men will, quite simply, grow a bigger skull than most women. (This reflects the higher androgen levels men have, as well as differences in genetic inheritance). More specifically to AGA, this means that, for most women, the frontal and parietal bones will be proportionately smaller than in the majority of men.
2.5.2 Growth potential
Associated with skull shape and size is its growth potential. This simply means that some skull shapes are more likely to grow than others.
For example, someone whose skull shape has a high growth potential will be especially prone to skull expansion, and so invariably develop severe AGA. And it follows that, anyone else with a very similar skull shape and growth potential will most likely develop AGA to the same extent.
Of course, very similar skull shapes often run in families, and you may already be aware that, if your mother or father lost their hair, you too have a very high chance of losing yours as well. (This explains the strong genetic connection that AGA can have within a family, especially between fathers and their sons).

2.6 Rate and location of hair loss
Skull shape and its growth potential can account for the different rates of hair loss, and the location (within the MPB region) in which it occurs.
2.6.1 Rate
The rate at which you lose hair is directly related to the extent of your skull expansion. This, quite obviously means that, the more your skull expands, the more hair you’re likely to lose. Copyright © 2008 by Paul Taylor 14
Skull Expansion – True Cause of Genetic Hair Loss
For the 20% of men whose skull shape has a high growth potent

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by opeth88 » April 6, 2009 at 11:26 am #117040

Ok, we’ve already looked at this before, but let’s examine these two fundamental parts to this theory in more detail –
1. First of all, let me make this perfectly clear: 5-alpha reductase, androgen receptor sites and DHT all exist in hair follicles for hair growth, not hair loss – your body does not want to lose something that insulates and protects your scalp from the sun, rain, cold, bugs, etc.
The current theory does not explain how and why any such proliferation of androgen receptor sites, 5-alpha reductase and DHT should occur within just the MPB region and nowhere else. In my view, any proliferation of androgen receptor sites is due to hyperandrogenicity 10.
What this basically means is that the body tries (unsuccessfully) to grow more hair (i.e., to offset skull expansion) by producing more DHT. If there’s an increased expression of the androgen receptor gene within the area of weak hair growth, receptor site proliferation will occur. (Again, remember, that’s what androgens like DHT do – they stimulate bone, muscle and hair growth, not hair loss).
Furthermore, 5-alpha reductase, androgen receptor sites and DHT also occur in bone tissue 7.
Coincidence?
No way!
To me, it seems crystal clear that DHT accumulation within the frontal and parietal bones cause these bones of the skull to continue growing – i.e., skull expansion.
2. The current theory has identified a number of genes that may be involved in AGA. These include: the androgen receptor or AR gene (STU1), 5a-reductase genes (SRD5A1 and SRD5A2), CYP17, etc. But, once again, no reason has been given why follicles in just one (MPB) region of the scalp should suffer hair loss, but not in any other. This theory simply states that each follicle must be genetically programmed for hair loss and that they appear to have a greater number of androgen receptor sites 11.
As you now know, it’s the genes responsible for skull growth (i.e., shape and size) that cause AGA. And, it’s this genetic connection that explains how AGA occurs within just the MPB region.
(I believe this current theory should now be reassessed and classed as an adjunct to the skull expansion process).
Now you know that skull expansion is the true cause of AGA, the next question you need to ask is:
What skull shapes will lead to skull expansion?
Figure 7 (below) shows two different skull shapes: one with no hair loss at all (i.e., a skull shape that did not experience any skull expansion), and one with severe hair loss (i.e., the eventual skull shape reached after, perhaps, many years of skull expansion).
You can see that, for those who suffer no hair loss at all, they’ll generally have a slightly more square shape to the skull. But, for those who suffer severe AGA, the skull expansion process Copyright © 2008 by Paul Taylor 16
Skull Expansion – True Cause of Genetic Hair Loss
will often create a somewhat rounded skull shape. (This rounded shape can also appear in both front and side profiles).
This is only a very simple explanation, but it does nevertheless reveal the skull shapes that generally correlate to the two extreme examples shown in Figure 7.
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by opeth88 » April 6, 2009 at 11:30 am #117041

Well… as I kept scrolling down, you gotta purchase an e-book. I think it’s scalp exercises..

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by opeth88 » April 6, 2009 at 11:30 am #117042

darn.

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by chore boy » April 6, 2009 at 12:40 pm #117048

We should get a poll going to see what people’s opinions are regarding this theory. People should say whether or not they believe it and give a little reason as to why. Maybe keep the criticism to a minimum as it’s only a poll.

I’ll start…

A few years ago I could have sworn my head was getting bigger and actually brought it up to a friend. I dismissed it as nonsense and moved on. Who knows, maybe androgens do control bone growth, yada yada and maybe my head actually did change shape but I definitely don’t believe that skull expansion = MPB… not a chance. About as far as I’ll go with it is that maybe if skull expansion is taking place, it might be putting stress on an already comprimised situation. Meaning, us balding folk have abreviated hair cycles already and maybe the fat skull is making it harder for the balding follicles to initiate anagen and angiogenesis… I don’t know.

There’s just too much stuff… why the robust hair growth with Cyclosporin? Why do all the huge-f*ckin’-melon-having people I’ve known throughout my life not have a problem with hair loss when if anyone’s skull would cause MPB, it would definitely accompany those huge melons. But then all the proponents of the theory would probably say that their scalp were somehow suited for it or something. There’s too much science behind hairloss to just come in and say that your head’s getting fatter and that’s why you’re losing your hair. How do they explain all the inhibitory characteristics/secretions found in balding follicles/dermal papilla? Are they a result of a fat head?

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by Saber28 » April 6, 2009 at 1:29 pm #117051

Skull expansion is impossible IMHO. Reason being that once the cranial bones fuse you’re not going to get any expansion. At least not without some SERIOUS pain involved. Males cranial bones fuse at around 20-21, females between 16-17. That’s around the same time other bones in the body fuse as well. Joints, knee’s elbows and what not. (Not that the joints fuse, but the join bones themselves.)

Once those bones fuse it is IMPOSSIBLE for anymore bone growth. Reason you see people who are 9 foot, 10 foot tall is because they usually have problems with their pituitary gland pumping out Human Growth Hormone like nothing else, and the bones never receive the stop growing signal so the bones never fuse. They are in a constant state of growth.

I tested this theory out. I have a fitted cap from when I was in the military. 10 years ago I was in the military. So I took my cap out of storage the first time I had read this theory and tried it on. Fit exactly the same as it did 10 years ago. My skull never expanded, but I’ve still lost hair.

After going over the skeletal system and seeing that once bones fuse it becomes nearly impossible to get them to grow after they’ve fused.

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by jdp710 » April 6, 2009 at 2:15 pm #117057

While I don’t believe skull expansion causes MPB, it is interesting nonetheless and may “help” explain part of the reason why we bald in a specific pattern.

Here’s what I mean:

Tap your fingers on your skull in the traditional MPB areas … do this for several minutes.

Now tap your fingers on the sides of your head where you won’t lose your hair.

Now tap your beard.

————————————————————————-

Notice how there is very little fat/muscle on your scalp. Notice how you have more fat/muscle on the sides of your head. Notice how your beard you have even more.

In my case, I noticed how that there is a small area in front of my crown, slightly to the side which has more fat/muscle than the other MPB areas. Is it coincidence that this is the last area that most lose hair before becoming a cue ball?

Just some food for thought

————————————————————————-

Anyway, enough speculation for one moment. Here’s what you can do about it if you believe that a thinner scalp = MPB … You can take magnesium. Here’s why I say that:

I’m going off the top of my head right now as I lost the information but when we are born we have a ratio of 6 to 1 magnesium to calcium. As we age, the ratio reverses.

MPB suffers, according to Dr. David Watts, “magnesium deficiency being a common trait in people with hair loss.”

And here’s where I’m trying to tie in less magnesium = closer your hair is to skull …

If you look at children and young adults, most of them have very healthy/bulky looking muscles. As you get older, the healthy/bulky muscles you had as a child are harder and harder to get. Well, I noticed that a good bioavailable magnesium supplement or trandermal magnesium brings back that healthy/bulky look. Previously I’d have to take large amounts of protein but not so when I take magnesium. I can actually tell if I’m low on magnesium based on how my muscles look. Here’s why … 30 percent of magnesium in your body is found in your muscles.

So again, a defiency of magnesium can be seen by unhealthy/weak/small sagging muscles, IMO. And don’t forget, most western people are deficient in magnesium. So in theory, supplementing with magnesium will give a little thicker muscle on your scalp helping to deal with skull expansion. Well, that is if you believe in that theory.

Here’s one last intersting quote ….

“Young women, children and most of all babies have soft body structures and smooth skin with low calcium and high magnesium levels in their cells and soft tissues. This is the biochemistry of youth. As we age and most pronounced in old men and post-menopausal women, we become more and more inflexible. The arteries harden to cause arteriosclerosis, the skeletal system calcifies to cause rigidity with fusion of the spine and joints, kidneys and other organs and glands increasingly calcify and harden with stone formation, calcification in the eyes causes cataracts and even the skin hardens, becoming tough and wrinkled.”

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by ljc08 » April 6, 2009 at 2:16 pm #117058

I agree with Saber. I don’t think the bones in the scull can expand once they have fused. I will say that my scull surface has changed marginally over the years. I remember when I was younger having like a dent on the parietal bone right side above my ear which is almost completely gone now. So it may have changed shape slightly, but i can’t see that being responsible for MPB, inflammation, etc. etc.

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by jdp710 » April 6, 2009 at 2:24 pm #117062

While I don’t believe skull expansion causes MPB, it is interesting nonetheless and may “help” explain part of the reason why we bald in a specific pattern.

Here’s what I mean:

Tap your fingers on your skull in the traditional MPB areas … do this for several minutes.

Now tap your fingers on the sides of your head where you won’t lose your hair.

Now tap your beard.

————————————————————————-

Notice how there is very little fat/muscle in your MPB areas. Notice how you have more fat/muscle on the sides of your head. Notice how your beard you have even more.

In my case, I noticed how that there is a small area in front of my crown, slightly to the side which has more fat/muscle than the other MPB areas. Is it coincidence that this is the last area that most lose hair before becoming a cue ball?

Just some food for thought

————————————————————————-

Anyway, enough speculation for one moment. Here’s what you can do about it if you believe that a thinner scalp = MPB … You can take magnesium. Here’s why I say that:

I’m going off the top of my head right now as I lost the information but when we are born we have a ratio of 6 to 1 magnesium to calcium. As we age, the ratio reverses.

MPB suffers, according to Dr. David Watts, “magnesium deficiency being a common trait in people with hair loss.”

And here’s where I’m trying to tie in less magnesium = closer your hair is to skull …

If you look at children and young adults, most of them have very healthy/bulky looking muscles. As you get older, the healthy/bulky muscles you had as a child are harder and harder to get. Well, I noticed that a good bioavailable magnesium supplement or trandermal magnesium brings back that healthy/bulky look. Previously I’d have to take large amounts of protein but not so when I take magnesium. I can actually tell if I’m low on magnesium based on how my muscles look. Here’s why … 30 percent of magnesium in your body is found in your muscles.

So again, a defiency of magnesium can be seen by unhealthy/weak/small sagging muscles, IMO. And don’t forget, most western people are deficient in magnesium. So in theory, supplementing with magnesium will give a little thicker muscle on your scalp helping to deal with skull expansion. Well, that is if you believe in that theory.

Here’s one last intersting quote ….

“Young women, children and most of all babies have soft body structures and smooth skin with low calcium and high magnesium levels in their cells and soft tissues. This is the biochemistry of youth. As we age and most pronounced in old men and post-menopausal women, we become more and more inflexible. The arteries harden to cause arteriosclerosis, the skeletal system calcifies to cause rigidity with fusion of the spine and joints, kidneys and other organs and glands increasingly calcify and harden with stone formation, calcification in the eyes causes cataracts and even the skin hardens, becoming tough and wrinkled.”

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by wildhair » April 6, 2009 at 4:46 pm #117069

I’ve got to ask, jdp710. What brand of magical magnesium are you taking?

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by Anxious1 » April 6, 2009 at 6:22 pm #117075

I do actually know of one way possible for the skull to expand after fusing, but my example is from a disease state, so maybe that makes it invalid, but ill say it anyway, at any age, Leukemia, or other bone marrow diseases can make the cells in the marrow multiply, im not gonna get into all the different immature cells and stuff, but i’ve seen horns growing on someones skull, and skull expansion from the extra pressure coming from the bone marrow within the skull.

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by opeth88 » April 6, 2009 at 7:39 pm #117082

wildhair- i know that question was for jdp, but I have Ancient Minerals mag oil that I got as a freebe when i ordered morocco method shampoo. Jdp said it was one of the best you can get. Ancient minerals has a website, but their oil is expensive! well kinda expensive… an 8oz bottle is $30 and the 64oz is $120

^ that’s the website. they also have gel and bath flakes too.

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by hapyman » April 6, 2009 at 8:13 pm #117087

Or you can look up Pure Mag Oil, which is the brand JDP, some others and I are using. Slightly cheaper.

I have been recently looking into dermarolling treatments. It seems that dermarolling helps restore the natural thickness to your skin by triggering the synthesis of collagen and other macromolecules. This might be just another piece to the puzzle.

BTW I have noticed my scalp is definitely more flexible since using lasers and I know others have reported the same thing. However, the skin in the problem areas are still noticeably thinner. So maybe dermarolling will be another nice treatment to do in conjunction with lasers.

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by BobTheBuilder » April 6, 2009 at 8:28 pm #117095

Great Bald head and Big Head we just cant win

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by nidhogge » April 7, 2009 at 1:31 am #117117

Guys–

I’ve been using transdermal Magnesium for close to 7-9 months now…lost track. The stuff is great and it *definitely* helps muscle mass as well!

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